Engineering

Aeronautical... biomedical... civil... environmental... geological... mechanical... technological... you're probably familiar with many types of engineering, but are you aware of the role a liberal arts education plays in preparing students for this challenging field? In a recent article, Harvard University's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences Dean expressed his hope that, in the future, engineering and other technological disciplines will be empowered by the problem-solving skills of the liberal arts. His outlook was echoed by Apple's chief executive officer, Steve Jobs, as he discussed the engineering of mobile technology at the unveiling of iPad 2.0: "Technology married with liberal arts...yields the result that makes our heart sing."

Morris Advantages

In addition to providing an outstanding liberal arts education—the Morris campus boasts the highest percentage of winners of the Horace T. Morse-Minnesota Alumni Association Award for Outstanding Contributions to Undergraduate Education at the University of Minnesota—the Morris campus offers Pre-Engineering students the following:

  • Sound preparation for students who are undecided about their path and wish to be prepared for a variety of science or engineering options
  • A solid foundation in math or science that gives students the tools they need to succeed in engineering
  • Undergraduate research program: Gives Pre-Engineering students a competitive edge
  • Stipend programs: Helping provide multiple options for funding students who want to conduct undergraduate research
  • Undergraduate Research Symposium: an annual event at which to present your findings
  • Service learning: Access to opportunities in a number of fields
  • Study abroad program: A nationally recognized program that prepares pre-professional students to collaborate in a global economy

Preparing for engineering at UMN Morris

Preparing for a career in Engineering

What Kind of Engineering?

All engineers work to improve the systems that support our communities. But if you like biology, you may want to consider environmental engineering. If you're a fan of computer classes, electrical engineering may be the choice for you. Here's a list of specialties with a brief description of each field, an overview of the areas you'll need to study for each specialty, and a comprehensive worksheet of preparatory courses.

Aerospace Engineering
  • Aerospace engineers design, develop, and test aircraft, spacecraft, and aeronautical defense systems. They also supervise the manufacture of these products. 
  • Comprehensive Worksheet
  • Areas of study
    • Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics (AEM)
    • Chemistry
    • Computer Science
    • Mathematics
    • Physics
Biomedical Engineering
  • Biomedical engineering advances knowledge in engineering, biology, and medicine, improving human health through cross-disciplinary activities that integrate the engineering sciences with the biomedical sciences and clinical practice. 
  • Comprehensive Worksheet
  • Areas of study
    • Biology
    • Chemistry
    • Computer Science
    • Mathematics
    • Statistics
Bioproducts and Biosystems (of Environmental Engineering)
  • Using the principles of biology and chemistry, these engineers develop solutions to problems, including water and air pollution control, recycling, waste disposal, and public health issues. 
  • Comprehensive Worksheet
  • Areas of study
    • Biology
    • Chemistry
    • Mathematics
    • Physics
    • Statistics
Chemical Engineering
  • Chemical engineers work in manufacturing, pharmaceuticals, healthcare, design and construction, pulp and paper, petrochemicals, food processing, specialty chemicals, polymers, biotechnology, and environmental health and safety industries, among others. 
  • Comprehensive Worksheet
  • Areas of study
    • Chemistry
    • Chemistry Engineering
    • Material Science
    • Mathematics
    • Physics
Civil Engineering
  • Civil engineers are leading users of sophisticated technology, applying the latest concepts in computer-aided design to efficiently develop and construct edifices and infrastructures. 
  • Comprehensive Worksheet
  • Areas of study
    • Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics (AEM)
    • Chemistry
    • Mathematics
    • Physics
    • Statistics
Computer and Software Engineering
  • Computer and software engineers analyze and evaluate computer systems including hardware and software. They might develop flexible manufacturing systems, mobile operating systems, biomedical information systems, gaming systems, search engines, web browsers, or global computerized distribution systems. 
  • Comprehensive Worksheet
  • Areas of study
    • Computer Science
    • Mathematics
    • Physics
Electrical Engineering
  • If it requires technology, it is designed by electrical engineers, whose most recent contributions include microchips, computers, cell phones, data transmission systems, and the latest in green energy resources. 
  • Comprehensive Worksheet
  • Areas of study
    • Chemistry
    • Computer Science
    • Mathematics
    • Physics
Geological Engineering
  • Geological engineering is concerned with the behavior of earth materials, using soil and rock mechanics to investigate subsurface conditions. Geological engineers often work closely with civil engineers on ground construction enterprises including mining and drilling. 
  • Comprehensive Worksheet
  • Areas of study
    • Chemistry
    • Geology
    • Mathematics
    • Physics
    • Statistics
Material Science and Manufacturing Engineering
  • Metals, ceramics, polymers, semiconductors, composites...if you can make something out of it, you'll need these engineers to tell you how. Material science engineers establish the best practices for using a wide range of materials. Manufacturing engineers oversee product development from planning to packaging, often working with elaborate technological systems involving robots, programmable controllers, or vision systems in the process. 
  • Comprehensive Worksheet
  • Areas of study
    • Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics (AEM)
    • Chemistry
    • Mathematics
    • Physics
Mechanical Engineering
  • This long-standing specialty is also one of the largest and broadest forms of engineering. Mechanical engineers use the principles of energy, materials, and mechanics to design and manufacture machines and devices of all types. They create the processes and systems that drive technology and industry. 
  • Comprehensive Worksheet
  • Areas of study
    • Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics (AEM)
    • Biology
    • Chemistry
    • Computer Science
    • Mathematics
    • Physics